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10 steps to a healthier Australia
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Jan 31

10 steps to a healthier Australia

10 steps to a healthier Australia

We all know the quintessential Australian stereotype: tall, tanned, healthy, and carefree. Maybe throw in a few beers.

But are we really a healthy nation? It would appear not.

A team of experts – scientists, clinicians, and healthy experts, recently got together to draft a set of health targets for Australia to achieve by 2025. You can view the report here.

And because we’re a lazy bunch, we collectively said “Goals? Aw, man!”

But the group’s top ten priority actions are worth paying attention to. They’ll help ensure a healthier nation for our and future generations. And hopefully reduce our risk of developing chronic diseases – which currently affect one in every two people!

Here are the recommendations:

Cut back on sugar

Finally, experts have acknowledged that sugar is a huge health problem. Incredibly, most of us (one in two adults, and three in four kids) have way too much of the sweet stuff. And this drives up our risk of gaining weight and developing diabetes – as well as other conditions and diseases such as heart disease.

The solution? A call for a 20% sugar tax on sugary drinks.

Ban junk food marketing

You’ve no doubt seen the fun, colourful ads for rubbish food like burgers and cereals. Experts agree there’s far too much of it shown to highly impressionable young people. They want to restrict the way food is marketed to children.

Continue quit campaigns

Here’s something we’re getting better at: quitting smoking. Which proves the health campaigns are working.

Get the quit message to more people

Remote communities, young Indigenous people, and people with mental illness have higher than average smoking rates. There’s a 2025 target to bring this down by at least 10%.

Be more active

Not enough young people are exercising – and over 90% of young Aussies aren’t meeting the recommended guidelines.

Review alcohol tax

The group wants alcohol taxation to be increased by 10% to minimise health and social impacts of irresponsible drinking.

Close the unemployment gap

More and better programs are needed for people with a mental illness, to help them return to and say in work.

Reduce salt intake

We all eat way too much salt, above the recommended 5 grams a day. The easier solution? Eat less processed foods and cut salt intake by 30%. Incredibly, this could save more than 3500 lives every year!

Better heart health education

Still, heart disease remains the number one killer in Australia. But many people aren’t getting the right treatment to reduce their risk.

Keep on track

Lastly, the advisory group has called for a national health survey to be conducted every five years. So we can all keep on track with our health goals.

10 steps to a healthier Australia

We all know the quintessential Australian stereotype: tall, tanned, healthy, and carefree. Maybe throw in a few beers.

But are we really a healthy nation? It would appear not.

A team of experts – scientists, clinicians, and healthy experts, recently got together to draft a set of health targets for Australia to achieve by 2025. You can view the report here.

And because we’re a lazy bunch, we collectively said “Goals? Aw, man!”

But the group’s top ten priority actions are worth paying attention to. They’ll help ensure a healthier nation for our and future generations. And hopefully reduce our risk of developing chronic diseases – which currently affect one in every two people!

Here are the recommendations:

Cut back on sugar

Finally, experts have acknowledged that sugar is a huge health problem. Incredibly, most of us (one in two adults, and three in four kids) have way too much of the sweet stuff. And this drives up our risk of gaining weight and developing diabetes – as well as other conditions and diseases such as heart disease.

The solution? A call for a 20% sugar tax on sugary drinks.

Ban junk food marketing

You’ve no doubt seen the fun, colourful ads for rubbish food like burgers and cereals. Experts agree there’s far too much of it shown to highly impressionable young people. They want to restrict the way food is marketed to children.

Continue quit campaigns

Here’s something we’re getting better at: quitting smoking. Which proves the health campaigns are working.

Get the quit message to more people

Remote communities, young Indigenous people, and people with mental illness have higher than average smoking rates. There’s a 2025 target to bring this down by at least 10%.

Be more active

Not enough young people are exercising – and over 90% of young Aussies aren’t meeting the recommended guidelines.

Review alcohol tax

The group wants alcohol taxation to be increased by 10% to minimise health and social impacts of irresponsible drinking.

Close the unemployment gap

More and better programs are needed for people with a mental illness, to help them return to and say in work.

Reduce salt intake

We all eat way too much salt, above the recommended 5 grams a day. The easier solution? Eat less processed foods and cut salt intake by 30%. Incredibly, this could save more than 3500 lives every year!

Better heart health education

Still, heart disease remains the number one killer in Australia. But many people aren’t getting the right treatment to reduce their risk.

Keep on track

Lastly, the advisory group has called for a national health survey to be conducted every five years. So we can all keep on track with our health goals.

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